The Orionid Meteor Shower

Oct. 19, 2018: Right now, specks of dust from Halley’s Comet are disintegrating in Earth’s atmosphere, kicking off the annual Orionid meteor shower. NASA cameras caught more than a dozen Orionid fireballs streaking across the USA during the past 48 hours, and the show is expected to improve during the weekend as Earth moves deeper into Halley’s stream of debris:

fireball_strip2

Above: This Orionid fireball, observed by Maciek Myszkiewicz in Oct. 2012, was as bright as a full Moon.

“The upcoming Orionids should provide a fairly good show for most visual observers,” says Peter Brown of the University of Western Ontario Meter Physics Group. “The shower’s radiant is already quite active and well defined in data from the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR).”

Orionids appear every year around this time when Earth crosses Halley’s debris stream, with the shower typically producing about 20 meteors per hour. Some of the brightest stars and constellations in the sky–e.g., Orion the Hunter, Sirius the Dog Star, and Taurus the Bull–form the shower’s backdrop. This makes the display extra-beautiful in disproportion to the raw number of meteors.

Some years, however, are even better than others. “Most notable was a short-lived outburst of relatively bright Orionids in 1993 observed several days before the predicted peak. This hints that there may be narrow filaments of larger meteoroids embedded in the overall debris stream,” says Brown. “We also observed enhanced Orionid activity in the years 2006 through 2009 with rates 2 to 3 times normal.”

This year’s shower has one thing going against it: The nearly full Moon. Lunar glare could reduce visible meteor rates 2- or 3-fold. The best time to look, therefore, is during the dark hours before sunrise when the Moon is sinking below the western horizon and the shower’s radiant in Orion is high in the southeast: sky map.

“Finding dark skies and clear weather in the early morning hours of Sunday, Oct 21st, just after the moon sets this year is the surest way to see these messengers from 1P/Halley,” says Brown. Enjoy the show!

Realtime Meteor Photo Gallery

 

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